Alan Carr’s Easy Way to Stop Smoking – this book could save your life

My little brother loaned me Alan Carr’s Easy Way to Stop Smoking the other week, saying it had helped him stop quite easily. I was less hopeful for myself since he’d always been a smoker of the more casual variety and I had been a staunch adherent for the last twelve years.

I’d always said I loved smoking, but I knew I’d have to quit one day or face some scary disease. I suppose I hoped that I’d be one of those people who wake up one day, maybe after a bout of flu, and just don’t fancy smoking any more, but it wasn’t happening and at 27 I was getting a bit scared that it never would.

So I started reading this book on a Saturday, smoking merrily away as I did so. Alan Carr encourages smoking as you read. I think this is one of the book’s best and most effective features. I read right through to the chapter called The Final Cigarette, by which point I was feeling fairly convinced that quitting was the way forward. (Carr warns against my usual half-assed solution of ‘cutting down’ in an extremely persuasive, logical way). Anyway, I wasn’t ready to stop yet so I went back to the beginning and read till I reached the Final Cigarette chapter again, at which point I read on until the finish. I then gathered all my smoking materials together (an almost full pouch of tobacco, a fresh pack of Rizla and every lighter I had in the house), put them in a plastic bag and went out onto the balcony to smoke my final cigarette. Once I’d finished it, I emptied the ashtray into the bag, went out to the rubbish chute and, with a feeling of misgiving, tipped it down into the abyss.

Alan Carr promises his readers a pain-free quitting experience that can, and I quote, ‘even be enjoyable’. His aim is both to teach his readers about the true nature of nicotine addition, free from scare tactics or judgement, and to deal with the psychological aspect: the ‘brainwashing’, as he calls it, that traps smokers into thinking that life without smoking can never be as enjoyable, and that for an indeterminate period after cessation life must be arduous and miserable.

Alan Carr (not the Chatty Man, in case you were wondering!) is not a great literary talent and the book starts off badly with an overlong section boasting about the book’s commercial success and a monotonous list of testimonials from satisfied readers. His style is extremely repetitive – every point is hammered home again and again and the use of capitals for emphasis is a little irritating. That’s the bad stuff about this book.

But none of it really matters, at least not to me as I have not smoked since I threw all my tobacco down the rubbish chute a week ago. Now, I’m aware that this is not that long to go without a cigarette and plenty of my smoking readers will have lasted that long on various failed attempts. But for me, who has never (apart from one day in which I climbed the walls and went to bed at nine in the evening so that I could wake up sooner and smoke again) attempted to do more than cut down it has been a revelation. More than that, it hasn’t been a hideous, arduous week. I’ve had the odd pang but no more than I frequently had during the cutting down process. From the first night, I’ve slept fine, I’ve been cheerful, I’ve been out in the company of my smoking friends and I’ve had a day of real stress – the sort of thing that would normally have had me smoking in a matter of minutes.

Before I read this book, I was told by the people I knew who’d used it that Carr basically tells you everything you already knew but in a way that helps you. That sounds odd but it is basically true. He deals with health, money and the tyranny of addiction and its social implications in a way that is gentle and relentless all at once. By avoiding shock tactics he helps the smoker absorb a message that he/she normally refuses to hear due to fear and/or resentment. He articulates all the crazy, silent, skewed thoughts a smoker has and harpoons every bit of flawed logic you could think of. He breaks down the barriers each smoker puts between him/herself and quitting and delivers just what he promises – a painless route to being a non-smoker.

Can I be assured that I’ll never smoke again? No. As far as I’m concerned, you can’t stack a week against twelve years. Having said that, I can’t see myself starting again. It’s been so shockingly easy to leave it behind since reading this book and I didn’t even feel ready to quit when I started it. Because Carr’s method stops you from feeling that you are making a sacrifice, there’s no misery in the quitting process. Indeed, I’ve been much happier this past week than I was the week before.

Of course, it won’t work for everyone. There is no method on earth that has a 100% success rate, but you only have to look at the Amazon rating to see that it has a whiff of the miraculous about it. Out of 913 reviews, 810 readers gave it five stars. Another 58 gave it four stars. The combined total of one, two and three star reviews is 49. It’s quite hard to argue with that, seeing as Amazon reviewers aren’t always the most generous souls (and you would think that was especially true of those who are in drug withdrawal!).

Anyway, if you are a smoker with an interest in giving up, this book is definitely worth a read. At less than £6 from Amazon it’s around the price of a pack of cigarettes. I’d recommend you also buy a pack of cigarettes that you can chain-smoke as freely as you like while you read the book. Who knows? It could be the last pack you ever want to buy without you even needing to get the flu. So far, it has certainly worked for me.

(Update – I wrote this over nine months ago and never got round to posting it, but I’m still tobacco-free!)

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